The EU’s GDPR

May 18th, 2018

You may have noticed emails coming to you from various organizations about the new GDPR the EU is inflicting on us. This site has always respected privacy of reader/commenters and is, frankly, not interested in identifying you, nor using that information.

However, WordPress does note some information:

The Admins can view your IP address, the email you supplied and [if you’ve filled it in] your website. No one below Admin status has access to this information and none of it is passed to any third party.

However, the new regulations require us to inform you, the reader, of what is going on and so we’ll start with a short report by Ken Craggs [https://twitter.com/BetweenMyths]:

The European Union General Data Privacy Regulation (GDPR) comes into effect globally on 25 May 2018. And there’s a somewhat vague category called ‘legitimate interests’. GDPR regulations also mean that organisations based in the EU won’t have to be as aggressive getting consent for data collection outside of Europe.

http://archive.is/8Sq2E#selection-2175.0-2175.7

A GDPR poster from the NHS Business Services Authority informs people that they share patient identifiable information for new medicines with the Drug Safety Research Unit at Southampton University which has a legal right to the information.

https://www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/help-your-patients-understand-how-their-prescription-information-used-and-protected

https://www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/privacy

Fine, now for the Taxpayers Alliance approach to it:

https://www.taxpayersalliance.com/privacy

Not all of that applies to us so to pick out bits which do:

We are committed to complying with data protection laws, including: ​

  • The General Data Protection Regulation (EU) 2016/679 (GDPR) and any related legislation which applies in the UK, including any legislation derived from the Data Protection Act 2018.
  • The Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations (2003) and any successor or related legislation, including the E-Privacy Regulation 2017/0003.
  • All other applicable laws and regulations relating to the processing of personal information and privacy, including statutory instruments and, where applicable, the guidance and codes of practice issued by the Information Commissioner’s Office or any other supervisory authority.

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We may hold personal information to this extent:

The Admins can view your IP address, the email you supplied and [if you’ve filled it in] your website. No one below Admin status has access to this information and none of it is passed to any third party.

That covers things relating to Orphans of Liberty.

4 comments for “The EU’s GDPR

  1. Hereward Unbowed.
    May 18, 2018 at 7:39 pm

    Cheers for the heads up James, and now we await HMG’s gold plated version and how they can make it oh so much more intrusive yah baby! da surveillance state is what fizzes their snatches & nuts, help from the caliphate too no doubt all the way from anatolia (and beyond that).

  2. Errol
    May 18, 2018 at 7:46 pm

    As governement is the leakiest sieve going, who will fine it? Will we, tax payers get a rebate when they foul up and lose all our records?

    As it stands, GDPR is a stupid idea. Facebook sell user data. So do Google. When facebook flog another few million to a dozen companies the EU, or a little person who thinks this isn’t Facebook’s MO will sue. Facebook, having lots of cash and no interest in changing will fight it in the courts, endlessly dragging it out until it becomes so btothersomely pointless that the law is ineffectual.

    As usual, the EU has made itself above this, government isn’t subject to the sanctions so it’s yet more legislation that does bugger all for anyone but makes the grubbing state feel better.

    • James Strong
      May 19, 2018 at 7:56 am

      I think your strongest point is that ‘as usual, the EU has made itself above this, government isn’t subject to the sanctions’.

      This, and associated actions of the state, would be worth a post on its own

  3. May 18, 2018 at 7:52 pm

    Yes.

Comments are closed.